health warning for honeybees
Health warning for honeybees

 

 

An outbreak of a disease affecting colonies of honeybees has been found in South Aberdeenshire; the Scottish Government has warned.

American ()was confirmed on Monday following laboratory diagnosis by Science and Advice for Scottish Agriculture (SASA).

The AFB infected hives have been destroyed as there is no permitted treatment for the disease in the UK. There are no risks to public health from AFB and no implications for the quality and safety of honey.

The affected apiaries are located near St Cyrus, South Aberdeenshire and the movement of and related equipment into or out of the affected area is prohibited.

 

farmers and are being urged to be vigilant for signs of the disease, to maintain good husbandry practices and to notify any suspicion of disease to Bees_Mailbox@gov.scot.

Classic signs of the disease are sunken cappings on cells, which when uncapped reveal dead larvae in various stages of decomposition. The larvae have a caramel-like, light to dark brown consistency and when drawn out, the decomposing material strings out rather than snapping off – the ropiness test.

Figure 1: American Foulbrood Symptoms: Ropey Dead Larvae and Black Scale. In this picture, you can see how a match stick is used to probe capped brood. Pick a cell with sunken, perforated cappings. When pulling the stick out from infected brood, a brown, ropey slime can be seen. Also pictured here are many cells with black, bacterial spore laden scales on the bottom of the cells, a condition unique to American Fouldbrood. Hold the frame in good light looking at an angle from the top bar towards the bottom bar of the frame. The inset picture shows a closeup of two cells with black scale in the bottom. PLEASE NOTE: in American foulbrood the scale remains stuck to the bottom of the cell. Melted larvae from European foulbrood can also produce a scale, but this scale will be rubbery and can be easily removed. Photo credit: Michael E Wilson
Figure 1: American Foulbrood Symptoms: Ropey Dead Larvae and Black Scale. In this picture, you can see how a match stick is used to probe capped brood. Pick a cell with sunken, perforated cappings. When pulling the stick out from infected brood, a brown, ropey slime can be seen. Also pictured here are many cells with black, bacterial spore-laden scales on the bottom of the cells, a condition unique to American Foulbrood. Hold the frame in good light looking at an angle from the top bar towards the bottom bar of the frame. The inset picture shows a closeup of two cells with black scale in the bottom. PLEASE NOTE: in American foulbrood the scale remains stuck to the bottom of the cell. Melted larvae from European foulbrood can also produce a scale, but this scale will be rubbery and can be easily removed. Photo credit: Michael E Wilson

 

How to spot (AFB)

AFB is a notifiable disease under The Bee Diseases and Pests Control (Scotland) Order 2007. It kills off bee larva, is highly contagious and difficult to eradicate. Unlike European Foulbrood (EFB) hives with AFB cannot be treated and must be destroyed.

In order to assist Scottish Government Bee Inspectors to control this and other diseases, beekeepers are urged to register on BeeBase, the national bee database. This will give them access to up-to-date information on the control of AFB and bee related issues.

Beekeepers in the area of this outbreak who are not on BeeBase are requested to register at https://secure.fera.defra.gov.uk/beebase/public/register.cfm or send their contact details to Bees_Mailbox@gov.scot.

 

Curated from several sources

herald Scotland

Wikipedia

beeinformed

Please feel free to share
Follow by Email
Facebook
Google+
https://www.beekblog.co.uk/news/health-warning-honeybees/
Twitter
Pinterest
LinkedIn